Categories
Disease & Condition Exercise & Fitness First Aid Food & Nutrition Food List Health Advice List of vaccines Mother & Child Health Symptoms and cure of the disease খাদ্য ও পুষ্টি খাদ্য তালিকা টিকার তালিকা প্রাথমিক চিকিৎসা ব্যায়াম ও খাদ্য নিয়ন্ত্রণ মা ও শিশু স্বাস্থ্য রোগ ব্যাধি রোগের লক্ষন ও প্রতিকার স্বাস্থ্য পরামর্শ

অক্সিজেন সরবরাহকারী প্রতিষ্ঠানের ঠিকানা ও ফোন নাম্বার।

Oxygencylinderbd
01714585817
Dhaka-1212
H#2, R#Madani Ave, Vatara

Nursinghomecarebd
01719661366
nursinghomecare2012@gmail.com
Gulshan-2
Dhaka, Vatara-40

Medical oxygen cylinder refill rent sell support in Bangladesh
880 1994-888999
House #3, Block #J, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh

Medical Oxygen Cylinder Price BD
+880 1716-671752
Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh

Verbalbd
+88 01819-311676
120/A, R.S Bhaban (2nd Floor), Motijheel C/A, Dhaka-1000

Oxygen Concentrator Price in Bangladesh
+880 1819-311676
Verbal Maa House, Road 17, house-5, Block-C, Dhaka 1219, Bangladesh

Medical oxygen home service company in dhaka bangladesh
+880 1682-000000
shebaagencybd@gmail.com
Muktobangla Shoping Complex, Level:09-233, Dhaka 1216

Oxygen generator concentrator cylinder home support in Bangladesh
nursinghomesupportbd
info@nursinghomesupportbd.com
+880 1940-101080
+880195-999-5312
+880184-031-9980
213(Ground Floor), Tajlen Road, Middle Paikpara, Mirpur-1, Dhaka-1216

Spectra Oxygen Limited – Dhaka Depot
780, 27 Bosila Setu Road, Dhaka, Bangladesh
+880 1713-173634
https://sol.com.bd/
info@sol.com.bd

Medical Equipment – Oxygen Cylinder Refill Rent Sell Supports in Dhaka Bangladesh. Nursing Home Care
+880 1714-585817
Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh

Oxygen Cylinder BD
+880 1718-018733
+8801911290527
nursingcareservicebd@gmail.com
House no: 12, Block: A, Flat: 2D, Ave No: 1, Section: 10, Dhaka 1216, Bangladesh
www.oxygencylinderhomedelivery.com
House no: 12, Block: A, Flat: 2D, Avenue: 1, Section: 10, Mirpur, Dhaka-1216, Bangladesh

OXYGEN CYLINDER HOME SERVICE
20 Nayabari, Sajid Plaza, Vatara, Natun Bazar-12, Dhaka, Bangladesh
880 1716-089838

Timely Product Ltd
235 Satarkul Rd, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh
+880 1712-444336
https://timelyproduct.com/
support@timelyproduct.com

Oxygen Bd EBL
+880 1613-203103
Dhaka 1216, Bangladesh

Islam Oxygen (Pvt) Ltd
+880 1313-204420
Tarabo, Rupgonj, Bangladesh
info@islamoxygen.com; islamoxygen@gmail.com; islamoxygensales@gmail.com
https://islamoxygen.com/

Oxygen Cylinder BD
+880 1714-558407
GULSHAN-2, NOTUN BAZAR, VATARA Dhaka, 1212, Bangladesh
info@oxygencylinder.live

Maisha Oxygen Cylinder Supplier
+880 1707-372001
11, parbati nagar, Thana Rd, Savar Union 1340, Bangladesh
https://maishacare.com/
info@maishacare.com
+8801315092095

24 Oxygen Home Support In Dhaka
+880 1716-671752
Mirpur ,1 Muktha Bangla Shopping Complex, Dhaka 1216, Bangladesh

Oxygen Sale BD
House No: 12, Road No: 6, Turag City, Mirpur: 1 Dhaka, 1216, Bangladesh
+880 1766-149264
https://oxygensalebd.com/
info@oxygensalebd.com

Union Oxygen Limited
Motijheel C/A, Suite# D-3, Nahar Mansion (3rd Floor), Dhaka, 1000, Bangladesh
+880 1617-727102
https://uolbd.business.site

M/S HALIMA ENTERPRISE
+880 1718-054477

Shema Oxygen Oxico Ltd.
Dhaka – Chittagong Hwy, Bhatiari, Bangladesh
+880 3127-80177

Kabir Oxygen Limited
Bhatiari, Bangladesh
+880 31-711501

Bismillah Enterprise
125 Katalgong, Chattogram, Bangladesh
+880 1856-859670

Linde Bangladesh Ltd.
285 Tejgaon Industrial Area Dhaka – 1208 Bangladesh
+880.2.8870322-27
Phone: 08 000 303 303 (toll free)
care.line.bd@linde.com
http://www.linde.com.bd/

M/S Padma Trading
Kuwaish Sonjog Sarak, Ward No. 3, Nayar Hat, Oxygen, Baksu Nagar, Bayezid, Chattogram 4213, Bangladesh
+880 1812-948747

Jaya Bijaya Engineering
348 Commerce College Road, Chattogram, Bangladesh
+880 1817-707178

Chottogram Device Center-CDC
1715, Jakir Hussain Road, Khulshi, Chattogram 4200, Bangladesh
+880 1912-760350

Taj Traders Pvt. Ltd
389 Nabab Siraj Ud Daula Rd, Chattogram, Bangladesh
+880 1711-802930
01844 071861
ttpl.tajscientific@gmail.com
http://www.tajscientific.com/

M/s. Jalalabad Tredars
+880 1711-982619
BOC Company Gate, Hazi Wazed Ali Lane, Adjacent Oxygen, Hathazari Road, Oxyzen, Chattogram 4213, Bangladesh

Medical Tools
Rd No. 1, Chattogram, Bangladesh
+880 1979-311707
info@medicaltoolsbd.com
medicaltoolsbd.com/public/

Dwip pharmecy
+880 1815-918028
Chattogram, Bangladesh

Islam Oxygen (Pvt.) Ltd. Chattogram Depot.
+880 1755-588096
Abdul Karim Rd, Chattogram 4213, Bangladesh

Oxygen supplier Sylhet
+880 1682-000000
https://oxygenbd.com/
3100, Bangladesh
8801795228222
shebaagencybd@gmail.com

Sylhet Oxygen Center
Bypass Road, Sylhet, Bangladesh
+880 1641-791929

M/s. Tems Corporation
Bypass Road, Homayun Roshid Chottor, Mominkhola, Sylhet 3100, Bangladesh
+880 1612-388585

Categories
Exercise & Fitness

A Good Way To Gain Weight If You’re Underweight

What’s a good way to gain weight if you’re underweight?

Although being lean can often be healthy, being underweight can be a concern if it’s the result of poor nutrition or if you are pregnant or have other health concerns. So, if you’re underweight, see your doctor or dietitian for an evaluation. Together, you can plan how to meet your goal weight.

Here are some healthy ways to gain weight when you’re underweight:

  • Eat more frequently. When you’re underweight, you may feel full faster. Eat five to six smaller meals during the day rather than two or three large meals.
  • Choose nutrient-rich foods. As part of an overall healthy diet, choose whole-grain breads, pastas and cereals; fruits and vegetables; dairy products; lean protein sources; and nuts and seeds.
  • Try smoothies and shakes. Don’t fill up on diet soda, coffee and other drinks with few calories and little nutritional value. Instead, drink smoothies or healthy shakes made with milk and fresh or frozen juice, and sprinkle in some ground flaxseed. In some cases, a liquid meal replacement may be recommended.
  • Watch when you drink. Some people find that drinking fluids before meals blunts their appetite. In that case, it may be better to sip higher calorie beverages along with a meal or snack. For others, drinking 30 minutes after a meal, not with it, may work.
  • Make every bite count. Snack on nuts, peanut butter, cheese, dried fruits and avocados. Have a bedtime snack, such as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, or a wrap sandwich with avocado, sliced vegetables, and lean meat or cheese.
  • Top it off. Add extras to your dishes for more calories — such as cheese in casseroles and scrambled eggs, and fat-free dried milk in soups and stews.
  • Have an occasional treat. Even when you’re underweight, be mindful of excess sugar and fat. An occasional slice of pie with ice cream is OK. But most treats should be healthy and provide nutrients in addition to calories. Bran muffins, yogurt and granola bars are good choices.
  • Exercise, especially strength training, can help you gain weight by building up your muscles. Exercise may also stimulate your appetite.

 

Categories
Exercise & Fitness

Physical Activity

Physical activity is an important part of your weight management program. Most weight loss occurs because of decreased calorie intake. Sustained physical activity is most helpful in the prevention of weight regain. In addition, exercise has a benefit of reducing risks of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, beyond that produced by weight reduction alone. Start exercising slowly, and gradually increase the intensity. Trying too hard at first can lead to injury.

Examples of moderate-intensity amounts of physical activity

Common Chores

  • Washing and waxing a car for 45–60 minutes
  • Washing windows or floors for 45–60 minutes
  • Gardening for 30–45 minutes
  • Wheeling self in wheelchair for 30–40 minutes
  • Pushing a stroller 1.5 miles in 30 minutes
  • Raking leaves for 30 minutes
  • Walking 2 miles in 30 minutes (15 min/mile)
  • Shoveling snow for 15 minutes
  • Stairwalking for 15 minutes

Sporting Activities

  • Playing volleyball for 45–60 minutes
  • Playing touch football for 45 minutes
  • Walking 1.75 miles in 35 minutes (20 min/mile)
  • Basketball (shooting baskets) for 30 minutes
  • Bicycling 5 miles in 30 minutes
  • Dancing fast (social) for 30 minutes
  • Water aerobics for 30 minutes
  • Swimming laps for 20 minutes
  • Basketball (playing game) for 15–20 minutes
  • Bicycling 4 miles in 15 minutes
  • Jumping rope for 15 minutes
  • Running 1.5 miles in 15 minutes (10 min/mile)

Activity Progression Samples

Beginners: standing activities, ironing, cooking, playing a musical instrument, etc.

Light: slow walking, garage work, house cleaning, childcare, etc.

Moderate intensity: faster walking, weeding the garden, cycling, tennis, etc.

High intensity: walking fast with a load uphill, basketball, climbing, soccer, etc.

You also may want to try:

  • Flexibility exercises to attain full range of joint motion
  • Strength or resistance exercises
  • Aerobic conditioning

 

Categories
Exercise & Fitness

Physical Activity Guide

Adults who are physically active are healthier and less likely to develop many chronic diseases than adults who are inactive. They also have better fitness, including a healthier body size and composition. These benefits are gained by men and women and people of all races and ethnicity who have been studied.

Adults gain most of these health benefits when they do the equivalent of at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic physical activity (2 hours and 30 minutes) each week. Adults gain additional and more extensive health and fitness benefits with even more physical activity. Muscle-strengthening activities also provide health benefits and are an important part of an adult’s overall physical activity plan.

Explaining the Guidelines

The Guidelines for adults focus on two types of activity: aerobic and muscle-strengthening. Each type provides important health benefits.

Aerobic Activity

Aerobic activities, also called endurance activities, are physical activities in which people move their large muscles in a rhythmic manner for a sustained period. Running, brisk walking, bicycling, playing basketball, dancing, and swimming are all examples of aerobic activities. Aerobic activity makes a person’s heart beat more rapidly to meet the demands of the body’s movement. Over time, regular aerobic activity makes the heart and cardiovascular system stronger and fitter.

The purpose of the aerobic activity does not affect whether it counts toward meeting the Guidelines. For example, physically active occupations can count toward meeting the Guidelines, as can active transportation choices (walking or bicycling). All types of aerobic activities can count as long as they are of sufficient intensity and duration. Time spent in muscle strengthening activities does not count toward the aerobic activity guidelines.

When putting the Guidelines into action, it’s important to consider the total amount of activity, as well as how often to be active, for how long, and at what intensity.

Key Guidelines for Adults

  • All adults should avoid inactivity. Some physical activity is better than none, and adults who participate in any amount of physical activity gain some health benefits.
  • For substantial health benefits, adults should do at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes (1 hour and 15 minutes) a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity. Aerobic activity should be performed in episodes of at least 10 minutes, and preferably, it should be spread throughout the week.
  • For additional and more extensive health benefits, adults should increase their aerobic physical activity to 300 minutes (5 hours) a week of moderate-intensity, or 150 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity. Additional health benefits are gained by engaging in physical activity beyond this amount.
  • Adults should also do muscle-strengthening activities that are moderate or high intensity and involve all major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week, as these activities provide additional health benefits.

How Much Total Activity a Week?

When adults do the equivalent of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week, the benefits are substantial. These benefits include lower risk of premature death, coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and depression.

Not all health benefits of physical activity occur at 150 minutes a week. As a person moves from 150 minutes a week toward 300 minutes (5 hours) a week, he or she gains additional health benefits. Additional benefits include lower risk of colon and breast cancer and prevention of unhealthy weight gain.

Also, as a person moves from 150 minutes a week toward 300 minutes a week, the benefits that occur at 150 minutes a week become more extensive. For example, a person who does 300 minutes a week has an even lower risk of heart disease or diabetes than a person who does 150 minutes a week.

The benefits continue to increase when a person does more than the equivalent of 300 minutes a week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity. For example, a person who does 420 minutes (7 hours) a week has an even lower risk of premature death than a person who does 150 to 300 minutes a week.

How Many Days a Week and for How Long?

Aerobic physical activity should preferably be spread throughout the week. Research studies consistently show that activity performed on at least 3 days a week produces health benefits. Spreading physical activity across at least 3 days a week may help to reduce the risk of injury and avoid excessive fatigue.

Both moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity should be performed in episodes of at least 10 minutes. Episodes of this duration are known to improve cardiovascular fitness and some risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

How Intense?

Guidelines for adults focus on two levels of intensity: moderate-intensity activity and vigorous–intensity activity. To meet the Guidelines, adults can do either moderate-intensity or vigorous-intensity aerobic activities, or a combination of both. It takes less time to get the same benefit from vigorous-intensity activities as from moderate-intensity activities. A general rule of thumb is that 2 minutes of moderate-intensity activity counts the same as 1 minute of vigorous-intensity activity. For example, 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity a week is roughly the same as 15 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity.

There are two ways to track the intensity of aerobic activity: absolute intensity and relative intensity.

    • Absolute intensity is the amount of energy expended per minute of activity. The energy expenditure of light-intensity activity, for example, is 1.1 to 2.9 times the amount of energy expended when a person is at rest. Moderate-intensity activities expend 3.0 to 5.9 times the amount of energy expended at rest. The energy expenditure of vigorous-intensity activities is 6.0 or more times the energy expended at rest.
    • Relative intensity is the level of effort required to do an activity. Less fit people generally require a higher level of effort than fitter people to do the same activity. Relative intensity can be estimated using a scale of 0 to 10, where sitting is 0 and the highest level of effort possible is 10. Moderate intensity activity is a 5 or 6. Vigorous-intensity activity is a 7 or 8.

Examples of Different Aerobic Physical Activities and Intensities

 Moderate Intensity

      • Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but not race-walking)
      • Water aerobics
      • Bicycling slower than 10 miles per hour
      • Tennis (doubles)
      • Ballroom dancing
      • General gardening

Vigorous Intensity

      • Race walking, jogging, or running
      • Swimming laps
      • Tennis (singles)
      • Aerobic dancing
      • Bicycling 10 miles per hour or faster
      • Jumping rope
      • Heavy gardening (continuous digging or hoeing, with heart rate increases)
      • Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack

Muscle-Strengthening Activity

      • Muscle-strengthening activities provide additional benefits not found with aerobic activity. The benefits of muscle-strengthening activity include increased bone strength and muscular fitness. Muscle-strengthening activities can also help maintain muscle mass during a program of weight loss.
      • Muscle-strengthening activities make muscles do more work than they are accustomed to doing. That is, they overload the muscles. Resistance training, including weight training, is a familiar example of muscle-strengthening activity. Other examples include working with resistance bands, doing calisthenics that use body weight for resistance (such as push-ups, pull-ups, and sit-ups), carrying heavy loads, and heavy gardening (such as digging or hoeing).
      • Muscle-strengthening activities count if they involve a moderate to high level of intensity or effort and work the major muscle groups of the body: the legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms. muscle strengthening activities for all the major muscle groups should be done at least 2 days a week.
      • No specific amount of time is recommended for muscle strengthening, but muscle-strengthening exercises should be performed to the point at which it would be difficult to do another repetition without help. When resistance training is used to enhance muscle strength, one set of 8 to 12 repetitions of each exercise is effective, although two or three sets may be more effective. Development of muscle strength and endurance is progressive over time. Increases in the amount of weight or the days a week of exercising will result in stronger muscles.

Ways to be even more active

For adults who are already doing at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity, here are a few ways to do even more. Physical activity at this level has even greater health benefits.

      • Forty-five minutes of brisk walking every day, exercising with resistance bands on 2 or 3 days;
      • Forty-five minutes of running on 3 or 4 days, circuit weight training in a gym on 2 or 3 days;
      • Thirty minutes of running on 2 days, 45 minutes of brisk walking on 1 day, 45 minutes of an aerobics and weights class on 1 day, 90 minutes (1 hour and 30 minutes) of social dancing on 1 evening, 30 minutes of mowing the lawn, plus some heavy garden work on 1 day;
      • Ninety minutes of playing soccer on 1 day, brisk walking for 15 minutes on 3 days, lifting weights on 2 days; and
      • Forty-five minutes of stationary bicycling on 2 days, 60 minutes of basketball on 2 days, calisthenics on 3 days.

 

Categories
Exercise & Fitness

A SMART Approach to Weight Loss

SMART Approach to Weight Loss

When it comes to weight loss, it’s easy to focus only on the number of pounds you need to lose without much thought given to lasting “lifestyle” changes. Successful weight loss is not so much about a number on the scale, it’s about adopting a lifestyle and setting goals that are based on changing the way you eat, exercise and behave. One way to do that is to use the SMART approach in creating a weight loss plan:

Specific:

Set goals that define specific behavioral changes. Instead of saying, “I’m going to lose weight,” redefine it and make it specific by saying, “I’m going to cut my calorie intake by 250 calories a day and exercise for 30 minutes a day.”

Measurable:

Set goals that are measurable and create ways to document progress. A measurable goal might be that you will lose 10% of your current body weight. Documenting progress could be in the form of keeping a food journal and exercise log. Measurable goals and documentation provides valuable feedback as you are progressing towards your goals and will increase your sense of accomplishment and motivation.

Action Oriented:

Clearly state the action that needs to be accomplished in order to achieve your goals. This allows you to actively work towards attaining them. For example, jogging for 30 minutes a day at a speed of 5 mph is an action oriented goal.

Realistic:

If your goals are not realistic, you’re setting yourself up for failure. Design your weight loss program by creating multiple short-term goals that are easily within reach. These will ultimately help you achieve your long-term goal. With each short-term goal success, you will gain the confidence and motivation that your weight loss goal can be achieved. If you’re having difficulty accomplishing a specific goal, make an adjustment or two so that it is more realistically attainable.

Timed:

Set a specific time frame to accomplish your goals. A series of timed short-term goals will serve as stepping stones to realize your long term goal. A time frame is also beneficial when it comes to needing to make some readjustments to goals that are not being met.

Based on the SMART approach, a simple weight loss program could look like this for a woman who is 5′ 7″ tall and weighs 171 pounds.

Long-term Goal:

  • Lose 12 pounds over the next 3 months for a BMI of 24.9. (Specific, measurable, action oriented, realistic, timed) See Fitness Partner’s BMI calculator.

Short-term Goal #1:

  • Over the next month (timed), lose 4 pounds (specific, measurable, action oriented and realistic) by cutting calorie intake to 1700 calories/day and briskly walking 30 minutes a day. (Specific, measurable, action oriented, realistic)
  • Track progress by keeping a food journal and documenting duration of exercise sessions each day. Weigh in every Monday morning and note weight in daily journal. (Action oriented and measurable documentation to provide feedback)

Short-term Goal #2:

  • Based on feedback and progress from last month, make any necessary adjustments required to accomplish the same goal as last month.
  • An additional change this month will be to add 30 minutes of strength training twice a week at the gym using 10-12 weight machines that target each major muscle group. (Specific, measurable, action oriented, realistic, timed) Strength training sessions will be noted in daily journal. (Action oriented and measurable documentation to provide feedback)

Short-term Goal #3

  • Based on feedback and progress from last month, make any necessary adjustments required to accomplish the same goal as last month.
  • An additional change this month will be to increase duration of brisk walks to 45 minutes a day and increase strength training sessions to 3 per week. (Specific, measurable, action oriented, realistic, timed) All will be documented in daily journal. (Action oriented and measurable documentation to provide feedback)

 

Categories
Exercise & Fitness

Getting Fit for Life

Exercise and Physical Activity: Getting Fit for Life

Exercise and physical activity are good for you, no matter how old you are. In fact, staying active can help you:

  • Keep and improve your strength so you can stay independent
  • Have more energy to do the things you want to do
  • Improve your balance
  • Prevent or delay some diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis
  • Perk up your mood and reduce depression

You don’t need to buy special clothes or belong to a gym to become more active. Physical activity can and should be part of your everyday life. Find things you like to do. Go for brisk walks. Ride a bike. Dance. Work around the house. Garden. Climb stairs. Swim. Rake leaves. Try different kinds of activities that keep you moving. Look for new ways to build physical activity into your daily routine.

Four Ways to Be Active

To get all of the benefits of physical activity, try all four types of exercise — 1) endurance, 2) strength, 3) balance, and 4) flexibility.

A. Try to build up to at least 30 minutes of activity that makes you breathe hard on most or all days of the week. Every day is best. That’s called an endurance activity because it builds your energy or “staying power.” You don’t have to be active for 30 minutes all at once. Ten minutes at a time is fine. How hard do you need to push yourself? If you can talk without any trouble at all, you are not working hard enough. If you can’t talk at all, it’s too hard.

Wall push-ups

  1. These push-ups will strengthen your arms, shoulders, and chest. Try this exercise during a TV commercial break.
    Face a wall, standing a little farther than arm’s length away, feet shoulder-width apart.
  2. Lean your body forward and put your palms flat against the wall at shoulder height and shoulder-width apart.
  3. Slowly breathe in as you bend your elbows and lower your upper body toward the wall in a slow, controlled motion. Keep your feet flat on the floor.
  4. Hold the position for 1 second.
  5. Breathe out and slowly push yourself back until your arms are straight.
  6. Repeat 10-15 times.
  7. Rest; then repeat 10-15 more times.

B. Keep using your muscles. Strength exercises build muscles. When you have strong muscles, you can get up from a chair by yourself, you can lift your grandchildren, and you can walk through the park.

Keeping your muscles in shape helps prevent falls that cause problems like broken hips. You are less likely to fall when your leg and hip muscles are strong.

Toe stands

This exercise will help make walking easier by strengthening your calves and ankles.

  1. Stand behind a sturdy chair, feet shoulder-width apart, holding on for balance. Breathe in slowly.
  2. Breathe out and slowly stand on tiptoes, as high as possible.
  3. Hold position for 1 second.
  4. Breathe in as you slowly lower heels to the floor.
  5. Repeat 10-15 times.
  6. Rest; then repeat 10-15 more times.

C. Do things to help your balance. Try standing on one foot, then the other. If you can, don’t hold on to anything for support.

Stand on one foot

You can do this exercise while waiting for the bus or standing in line at the grocery. For an added challenge, you can modify the exercise to improve your balance.

  1. Stand on one foot behind a sturdy chair, holding on for balance.
  2. Hold position for up to 10 seconds.
  3. Repeat 10-15 times.
  4. Repeat 10-15 times with other leg.
  5. Repeat 10-15 more times with each leg.

D. Stretching can improve your flexibility. Moving more freely will make it easier for you to reach down to tie your shoes or look over your shoulder when you back the car out of your driveway. Stretch when your muscles are warmed up. Don’t stretch so far that it hurts.

Back of leg stretch

This exercise stretches the muscles in the back of your legs. If you’ve had hip or back surgery, talk with your doctor before trying this stretch.

  1. Lie on your back with left knee bent and left foot flat on the floor.
  2. Raise right leg, keeping knee slightly bent.
  3. Reach up and grasp right leg with both hands. Keep head and shoulders flat on the floor.
  4. Gently pull right leg toward your body until you feel a stretch in the back of your leg.
  5. Hold position for 10-30 seconds.
  6. Repeat at least 3-5 times.
  7. Repeat at least 3-5 times with left leg.

Who Should Exercise?

Almost anyone, at any age, can do some type of physical activity. You can still exercise even if you have a health condition like heart disease or diabetes. In fact, physical activity may help. For most older adults, brisk walking, riding a bike, swimming, weight lifting, and gardening are safe, especially if you build up slowly. But, check with your doctor if you are over 50 and you aren’t used to energetic activity. Other reasons to check with your doctor before you exercise include:

  • Any new symptom you haven’t discussed with your doctor
  • Dizziness or shortness of breath
  • Chest pain or pressure or the feeling that your heart is skipping, racing, or fluttering
  • Blood clots
  • An infection or fever with muscle aches
  • Unplanned weight loss
  • Foot or ankle sores that won’t heal
  • Joint swelling
  • A bleeding or detached retina, eye surgery, or laser treatment
  • A hernia
  • Recent hip or back surgery

Safety Tips

Here are some things you can do to make sure you are exercising safely:

  • Start slowly, especially if you haven’t been active for a long time. Little by little, build up your activities and how hard you work at them.
  • Don’t hold your breath during strength exercises. That could cause changes in your blood pressure.It may seem strange at first, but you should breathe out as you lift something and breathe in as you relax.
  • Use safety equipment. For example, wear a helmet for bike riding or the right shoes for walking or jogging.
  • Unless your doctor has asked you to limit fluids, be sure to drink plenty of fluids when you are doing activities. Many older adults don’t feel thirsty even if their body needs fluids.
  • Always bend forward from the hips, not the waist. If you keep your back straight, you’re probably bending the right way. If your back “humps,” that’s probably wrong.
  • Warm up your muscles before you stretch. Try walking and light arm pumping first.

Exercise should not hurt or make you feel really tired. You might feel some soreness, a little discomfort, or a bit weary, but you should not feel pain. In fact, in many ways, being active will probably make you feel better.

 

Categories
Exercise & Fitness

Healthy Eating Plan

Healthy Eating Plan

A healthy eating plan gives your body the nutrients it needs every day while staying within your daily calorie goal for weight loss. A healthy eating plan also will lower your risk for heart disease and other health conditions.

A healthy eating plan:

  • Emphasizes vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat dairy products
  • Includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, and nuts
  • Limits saturated and trans fats, sodium, and added sugars
  • Controls portion sizes

Calories

To lose weight, most people need to reduce the number of calories they get from food and beverages (energy IN) and increase their physical activity (energy OUT).

For a weight loss of 1–1 ½ pounds per week, daily intake should be reduced by 500 to 750 calories. In general:

  • Eating plans that contain 1,200–1,500 calories each day will help most women lose weight safely.
  • Eating plans that contain 1,500–1,800 calories each day are suitable for men and for women who weigh more or who exercise regularly.

Very low calorie diets of fewer than 800 calories per day should not be used unless you are being monitored by your doctor.

 

Categories
Exercise & Fitness

How to Quit Smoking

How to Quit Smoking

Smoking is implicated as a risk factor for many health problems, including:

  • Premature death: cigarette smoking is the single most important cause of premature death. Most premature deaths caused by smoking are due to lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary heart disease.
  • Cancers of the upper respiratory tract, oesophagus, bladder, kidney, stomach, and pancreas; myeloid leukaemia.
  • Cerebrovascular disease, aortic aneurysm, and heart failure caused by coronary heart disease.
  • Peptic ulceration (gastric and duodenal).
  • Angina, peripheral arterial disease (including Buerger’s disease), macular degeneration, impotence, infertility, skin wrinkling, osteoporosis.
  • Increased severity of asthma, respiratory tract infections and diabetic retinopathy.
  • Passive smoking: exposure to environmental tobacco smoke causes an increased risk of smoking-related diseases, especially lung cancer and heart disease.
  • Children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke are at increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome, asthma, otitis media and chest infections in the first years of life.
  • Fetal exposure to maternal smoking increases the risk of miscarriage, premature birth, low birth weight and stillbirth. Smoking in pregnancy may also affect the child’s physical growth and academic attainment may be reduced.

How to Quit-smoking basics

Tobacco is a killer. Smokers and other tobacco users are more likely to develop disease and die earlier than are people who don’t use tobacco

Nicotine is highly addictive, and to quit smoking — especially without help — can be difficult. In fact, most people don’t succeed the first time they try to quit smoking. It may take more than one try, but you can stop smoking.

Take that first step: Decide to quit smoking. Set a stop date. And then take advantage of the multitude of resources available to help you successfully quit smoking.

Quit-smoking action plan

Now that you’ve decided to quit smoking, it’s time to map out your quit-smoking action plan. One of the first steps of your quit-smoking action plan should be “Get support.”

Support can come from family, friends, your doctor, a counselor, a support group or a telephone quit line. Support can also come from use of one or more of the medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration for smoking cessation.

Another key step in your quit-smoking action plan? Planning for challenges. For example, make a list of high-risk places you’ll want to avoid when you start your quit-smoking plan. Think of other places to go where smoking isn’t allowed, such as a shopping mall, a museum or movie theater.

Living smoke-free

What does living smoke-free mean? Living smoke-free is your opportunity to live a healthier and probably longer life. By the end of your first year, your risk of heart attack decreases by half. After 15 years, it’s almost the same as someone who never smoked. Living smoke-free can also mean better quality of life — with more stamina and a better ability to appreciate tastes and smells.

But living smoke-free doesn’t mean living stress-free. In fact, smokers often cite stress as a reason for relapsing. Instead of using nicotine to help cope with stress, you’ll need to learn new ways to cope. Be proactive. You can find out more about stress management online or at the library. For more help, talk with your doctor or a mental health provider.

Nicotine replacement therapy

Available methods of NRT include:

  • Patches
  • Gum
  • Nasal spray
  • Mouth spray
  • Inhalation cartridge
  • Lozenges
  • Sublingual tablets

 

Categories
Exercise & Fitness

How to Lose Weight

How to Lose Weight

Weight-loss basics

Your weight is a balancing act, and calories are part of that equation. Fad diets may promise you that counting carbs or eating a mountain of grapefruit will make the pounds drop off. But when it comes to weight loss, it’s calories that count. Weight loss comes down to burning more calories than you take in. You can do that by reducing extra calories from food and beverages, and increasing calories burned through physical activity.

Diet plans

When it comes to weight loss, there’s no shortage of diet plans. Check any magazine rack, and you’re bound to see the latest and greatest diet plans. But how do you know if a diet plan fits your needs and lifestyle? Ask yourself these questions about any diet plan you’re considering:

  • Does it include various foods from the major food groups: fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat dairy products, lean protein sources and nuts?
  • Does it include foods you like and that you would enjoy eating for a lifetime — not just for several weeks or months?
  • Can you easily find these foods in your local grocery store?
  • Will you be able to eat your favorite foods, or better yet, all foods?
  • Does it fit your lifestyle and budget?
  • Does it include proper amounts of nutrients and calories to help you lose weight safely and effectively?
  • Is regular physical activity part of the plan?

If the answer to any of these questions is no, keep looking. There are better diet plans out there for you.

Diet and exercise

How can you lose weight? With diet and physical activity. The key to successful weight loss is developing healthy diet and exercise habits. You may not like those words — diet and exercise. Don’t get hung up on the words. Diet just means eating healthy, lower calorie meals. Exercise means being more active.

Although people appropriately focus on diet when they’re trying to lose weight, being active also is an essential component of a weight-loss program. When you’re active, your body uses energy (calories) to work, helping to burn the calories you take in with food you eat.

Cleaning the house, making the bed, shopping, mowing and gardening are all forms of physical activity. Exercise, on the other hand, is a structured and repetitive form of physical activity that you do on a regular basis.

Whatever activity you choose, do it regularly. Aim for at least 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity — preferably spread throughout the week. Keep in mind that you may need more physical activity to lose weight and keep it off.

Diet pills, supplements and surgery

Diet pills and surgery can help with weight loss — when combined with a healthy diet and physical activity. But diet pills aren’t for everyone. Neither is surgery. In fact, many doctors consider them only if you have weight-related health problems.

If you’re in that group, you and your doctor need to carefully evaluate the potential benefits of diet pills or surgery and weigh them against the possible long-term risks. Your doctor will also counsel you about the lifestyle changes you’ll need to make to be successful over the long term.

A word of caution: Although you can find diet pills and supplements at the drugstore, supermarket, health food store and online, virtually none have been proved effective. And some are downright dangerous. Talk with your doctor before taking any diet pills or supplements.